Posts Tagged ‘help’

i realise

Posted: March 18, 2020 in Uncategorized
Tags: , , , , , ,

it had gone, gone a long time ago
i can’t remember how it went or why
but i knew it had gone, i thought
forever, till you came and opened
my door, took me outside, poured
water on my dry skin, watched it
flow down the cracks in my face,
filling them with life and watched
me smile for the first time in years
as i remembered who i was, became
aware that i was still breathing
and realised that i had a life to live


My doctor never asked me how I was feeling, why I felt that way or what had made me come to see him. He never asked me if I needed support or directed me to services that could help me. He just gave me pills to numb reality and sent me away. Another person on the conveyor belt of depression where the only winners are the pharmaceutical companies who make billions every year from people unable to cope with life.


Some good advice on what to do when you have the dreaded writers block from Roy Marshall

Roy Marshall

This piece is for writers who are not writing as much as they would like and are worried about it.   

I don’t like the term ‘writer’s block’. I don’t think it is helpful. That doesn’t mean I don’t have periods when I start to wonder if I will write anything ever again. I do. And whether you use the term ‘block’ or not, I do empathize with those who find it difficult to get through periods of not writing very much or not at all.   People use the term ‘block’ when they feel incapable of producing anything of worth. But to label a phase of relative or complete inactivity as ‘block’ seems to imbue it with a tangible quality and thus give it a great and sinister power.         

Block   

The word ‘block’ makes me think of an obstruction. This implies that the normal state of the writer is to be a freely…

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Here’s the third of my blogs as Writer in Residence for Kirklees. Hope you enjoy reading it.


Another great blog I have discovered recently by Angela Topping. Some very good tips on editing your poetry here.

Angela Topping

Since this is a new year, I decided to share my most recent set of rules for editing. I never worry about rules when I am writing a poem; I believe in letting the poem do its thing. But editing a poem is a different matter and requires a different set of skills. These rules come from what I have noticed what flaws there often are in my first drafts.

Angela’s Rules:

1) Watch out for tautology

2) Take care to avoid unknowing repetition

3) See whether you need ands, yets, buts and articles

4) Let the darkness in

5) Don’t be scared, say what you really mean

I devised this version of them after the recent Lumb Bank course with David Morley and Caroline Bird, a course which made me braver in my work. I do recommend their work, and also the work of Liz Berry, whose enchanting collection…

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