Archive for January, 2015


you got inside my body

came from nowhere

unnoticed, unannounced, unknown

an alien seed mutating

from a nameless source

not the tree of life though

and you spread your roots

far and wide

reaching every part of my body

every muscle

every bone

every organ

that enables me to live

and you came

and tried to take it all away


Some very good advice on putting together a poetry pamphlet from Roy Marshall.

Roy Marshall

This piece is addressed to those poets who haven’t had a collection published before, so I’ll be covering what I consider to be the basics of putting a pamphlet together based on my own experience and including ideas and advice I’ve picked up from my reading and listening to others.

The majority of poetry pamphlets contain twenty to twenty-five poems. The first thing you will need (apart from enough poems of course) is to set aside some

Time

clockface

Selecting and ordering poems is a creative exercise that requires attention and care.  If you are hurried or under pressure to meet a deadline you probably won’t be able make the best judgements and as a result you are unlikely to enjoy the process or have the satisfaction of knowing you have put in your best effort.
It’s best to start the process and return to it over a period of days, weeks or months.

You…

View original post 1,682 more words


This is the latest edition of the eclectic Hinterland poetry featuring a poem by Owen Vince, the first in a series of four.


A very interesting blog from Anthony Wilson about writing and illness.

Anthony Wilson

10903545_373339849493484_917456197_n

Reading Arthur W. Frank’s astonishing At the Will of the Body  recently has given me pause to reflect on the relationship between illness and writing. One of the chief delights of reading Frank’s account of his heart attack and cancer is his beautifully modulated prose style. As I only half-joked, it seems to be written entirely in quotes, each page both measured and solid as a dresser made of teak.

Not having been at my best of late -rest assured: this is not a coded reference to relapsing- it occurred to me that Frank’s book achieves the mastery it does after the event as it were. The past tense is a wonderful thing. It brought to mind another joke, of the friend who told me he read my memoir of cancer Love for Now in double-quick time, to see if I lived.

They are different beasts. Love for Now

View original post 314 more words


Here is my final blog as Writer in Residence for Kirklees.

No escape

Posted: January 27, 2015 in Andy Smith
Tags: , , , , , , ,

the empty hotel room

was as cold

as her heart

a chamber of

icicles as red

as the midnight sun

that never sets

frozen in time

like the insects

in an amber mausoleum

trapped in resin from

where there is no escape

for the insects

for the sun

for me


Kim Moore’s weekly blog including the peril’s of the dreaded tax return and a wonderful poem by Roz Goddard.

Kim Moore

I am so relieved this week is over.  It has been filled with the misery of the annual tax return.  I think I’ve spent about three full days on it.  Every year at this time I make a resolution to keep my books up to date, to file both my expenses and my income from my writing as I go along, to file my receipts according to month and not just throw them into a shoebox in the corner of the room.  I said all of these things to myself last January when I was in the depth of despair and by February I’d forgotten.  But this time I really mean it!  I have even labelled envelopes month by month and I am slowly sorting through the receipts I have so far for this year.   I have to get more organised about this because this coming tax year, my third…

View original post 891 more words


John Foggins weekly blog featuring the excellent and eclectic Anthony Costello.

The Great Fogginzo's Cobweb

Anthony-Costello

The more I get to know about the world of poetry, the less familiar it feels. A little knowledge can be a comfortable as well as a dangerous thing. And I certainly feel uncomfortable with the occasional squabbles and small jealousies I may encounter, when most of the time the bit of the poetry world I actually know is welcoming and generous. Thus it was that I was simultaneously taken aback and entertained by Anthony Howell’s ‘Fear and loathing in the Royal Festival Hall’ ( an article someone Shared on my Facebook page from The Fortnightly Review. Another bit of the poetry world I’d never heard of). Because I’ve always enjoyed the splenetic squabbles of the world of Pope, Dryden and Swift I suppose I felt a guilty pleasure at the sustained crossness of Howell’s piece. At the same time I was puzzled by the crossness. There’s a lot…

View original post 2,058 more words


The latest blog from Roy Marshall

Roy Marshall

Copies of the new print run of my book arrived on my doorstep today. If you would like to buy a copy please click the link on ‘The Sun Bathers’ page above.

In other news, I’m pleased to have been invited to read with Liz Berry, Geraldine Monk and Les Malheureux at the John Rylands Library in Manchester next month. If you read my review of Liz’s ‘Black Country ‘ on here a while back you’ll know high highly I rate her work and the venue  is lovely so I’m looking forward to it. You can find details on the Poets and Players website.

Like a lot of people, I’m not at my best at this time of year, so it was  good to hear that my short story ‘Late’ has been highly commended in the Bare Fiction  short story competition.  Bare Fiction is a relatively new and very well produced print magazine that has already established…

View original post 515 more words


Here’s the third of my blogs as Writer in Residence for Kirklees. Hope you enjoy reading it.